Whole house coverage gl-b1300


#1

I have dead spots in my wifi and I am looking to use the whole-house coverage feature of the gl-b1300. Is there any guides telling me how to set this up? What else should I buy besides the gl-b1300 which I already own?
Thanks.


#2

You need to buy another one and setup mesh according to the user manual. The other one should be put in a place which can cover the dead spot and the existing B1300.


#3

Can you show me something online more detailed than just plain “according to the manual?” Also I need another b1300 or is there a different router I can buy? I bought the b1300 as a main router but maybe a cheaper/simpler router can be used in this case?


#4

Maybe you can just bu a repeater, e.g. USB150, AR150 or AR300M

Then set up WISP/WDS. Which is much simpler and cheap.


#5

what about the MT300N-V2? (If I stay with the GL.inet brand…)


#6

That should work as well.


#7

Not sure if gluser already has his solution, but to summarize (because others may find this thread later), the issue between a repeater (WISP or WDS) or using mesh networking in a home setting is one determined by how many wireless hops one will need to reach the dead-spots.

If you can reach all the deadspots with only one wireless hop, I would think a repeater will be your least complicated solution. You don’t need to have the same model (or even brand) of routers. WISP is easy to set up, but partitions your home network into multiple subnets, meaning devices on one subnet probably won’t be able to communicate to other subnet, but both subnets have a path to the Internet.

WPS requires that all the relevant routers support WDS. Many modern routers do these days. WPS is preferable to WISP when you do not want the multiple subnets, i.e. you want everything in your house to talk to everything else (not just the Internet).

Mesh is generally not well-standardized, so if you plan on a Mesh, you should have identical routers, i.e. a bunch of B1300s. In a home setting, I would likely only use Mesh if I had 3-4 wireless hops required to reach a wired router.